Go to Main Content

Framingham State University

 

HELP | EXIT

Catalog Entries

 

Summer 2012
Apr 19, 2014
Transparent Image
Information Select the Course Number to get further detail on the course. Select the desired Schedule Type to find available classes for the course.

HIST 802 - Colonial America
An in-depth study of social and political developments in British North America from initial colonization to 1763. The course stresses the adaptation of traditional institutions and thought patterns to the New World environment.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 804 - The American Revolution
This course will deal with the political and social history of the American people from 1763-1789. In those years the Americans outgrew their colonial status and began to evolve a sense of nationhood. When attempts to resolve the question of sovereignty with the British Empire failed, the colonists declared their independence, organized for war, achieved victory, and went on to establish a more permanent political union.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 806 - Jeffersonian through Jacksonian America
This course covers a vital transitional epoch in American history from the Federal era to the age of Jackson. Especially stressed is the shift from a deferential to an increasingly democratic society.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 807 - Maritime History of New England
A survey of the sea's legacy from the earliest Indian fishery to the shipbuilding and commerce of today. Course themes include historical, political, and economic developments, with particular attention to insights gleaned from the investigation of shipwrecks, time capsules of discrete moments from new England's past. Classes include visits to museums, a field session at a maritime archaeology site, and guest lectures on current research projects. This course is offered through the Marine Studies Consortium and is taught at an off-campus location. Additional course fees apply.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 808 - American Civil War Era
An intensive analysis of the social, political and economic factors in Antebellum America that led to the Civil War, and the problems of reconstructing the nation after the war.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 810 - Emergence of a Modern Nation
A study of United States history from 1877-1920. Topics include the change in the national spirit from the Gilded Age to the rise of industrialism, imperialism, and World War I. Special emphasis is given to the dominant roles of Theodore Roosevelt, Taft, and Wilson in transforming the nation. Prerequisites: An undergraduate course in United States History since Reconstruction or permission of instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 812 - America in Crisis
A study of political, economic, and diplomatic transformations in the United States since 1932. The focus is on the Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, post-World War II foreign and domestic policies, the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and the expanding role of the federal government.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 814 - United States Diplomatic History
This course presents the evolution of America's major foreign policies. Among the factors considered in the formulation of American diplomacy are economic concerns, cultural attitudes, the role of individuals, and the nation's constitutional basis as well as foreign events. Prerequisite:A course in either U.S. History or American Politics.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 818 - Religion in America
A study of the growth of a denominational society in the United States. The course is especially concerned with the impact of the American environment on religions imported from Europe and elsewhere, the development of new American faiths, and the contributions of religion to the core values of American Society.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 823 - African-American History
An examination of African-American history from the colonial era to the present. Topics include the rise of chattel slavery, the influence of African-Americans on the American economy, the evolution of Jim Crow, the rise of the Civil Rights Movement of the twentieth century, the effects of constitutional and legal changes, and contributions of African-Americans to American culture. Prerequisites: HIST 151 US History to Reconstruction and HIST 152 US History Since Reconstruction or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 826 - Women in American History
A study of the changing roles of women from colonial times to the present. Topics include society's stereotypes of women; women's social, family, and work roles; and the effect of legislative and constitutional changes on women. Prerequisite: 32.151 United States History to Reconstruction or 32.152 United States History since Reconstruction.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 831 - Harding to Roosevelt 1920-1945
An in-depth study of the interwar years and World War II. Topics examined may include cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and social unrest of the era, the Republican ascendancy, the Great Depression, New Deal, class conflict, and World War II at home and abroad. Prerequisites: A 100-level survey course in United States or European or World history and sophomore standing, or permission of instructor.
1.000 Credit hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 836 - Latin America: From the Conquest to the Present
Political, social, economic and cultural history treating the colonial period, the independence movement, the emergence of modern states, and contemporary Latin America. Attention will be given to the significance of Iberian heritage, the Roman Catholic Church, worker and peasant populism, military authoritarianism, and influence of the United States. Prerequisite:A survey course in either American history or Western Civilization, or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 840 - Industrial and Labor Forces in the United States
A study of the historical development of industry and labor in the U.S. from the middle of the nineteenth century to the present. Special emphasis is placed upon the historical forces that helped to foster industrial growth, the social impact of newly-created corporations, the legal milieu that made expansion possible, the growth of organized labor and class consciousness, and the evolution of a unified, integrated monetary and banking system. Prerequisite:32.151 U.S. History to Reconstruction, 32.152 U.S. History since Reconstruction or 62.110 Introduction to American Politics.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 841 - Total, Limited, and Cold: America at War in the 20th Century
Examines how wars have shaped the United States' politics, society, and economic policies during the twentieth century. From the Filipino-American War to the Persian Gulf War, Americans have been fighting much of the century. The concept of warfare has shifted to fit the country's changing role in world affairs, from an isolationist nation in the late nineteenth century to a Superpower after World War II.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 850 - Historical Study Tour
A guided tour, or series of tours, of significant sites, cities, or landmarks in the human past. This course also includes traditional or other methods of teaching. Topics vary according to the specialty of the faculty member. Students are expected to prepare in advance for the excursions and are examined on their learning experiences.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 851 - History of Modern Science - The Copernican Revolution to Present
A historical examination of the revolution in modern science. After a brief introduction to the structure of scientific revolutions and a comparison of the concepts of political and scientific revolutions, the course deals with major transformation in science from Copernicus to the computer. Prerequisite:32.154 Western Civilization since the Renaissance or 32.155 The Comparative History of World Civilization.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 856 - Historical Research and Writing
This course will introduce students to the theories and methods of historical research and writing.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 858 - Topics in History
A special topic in history to be given at the discretion of the Department. Course topic is determined by the instructor with an emphasis on developing a critical and analytical understanding of the subject under consideration, including relevant historiography. No more than two topics courses may be used to satisfy the departmental requirements for history majors. When topics courses are to be offered, the faculty member presenting the course and its subject will be announced during the prior semester.
1.000 Credit hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 862 - Ancient Greece: From the Homeric through the Hellenistic Age
This course will focus on the history of ancient Greece. Topics will include the society and thought of the Homeric period; the rise of the polis and the thought of the Archaic age; the Persian wars, the Athenian empire, Periclean Athens, the Peloponnesian wars, and the thought of the fifth century; and the empire of Alexander the Great and the thought of the Hellenistic age.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 864 - Ancient Rome: The Republic and the Empire
This course will focus on the history of ancient Rome from the founding of the Republic to the collapse of the Empire. Topics will include the evolution and decline of the Republic, its concept and institutions of government; the reign of Julius Caesar and the rise of Caesarism; the rise of Augustus and the formation of the Empire; and the reigns of the emperors Diocletian, Constantine, and Theodosius. The contributions of Rome in the fields of political, constitutional, and legal thought and institutions will also be stressed.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 865 - The History of Gender, Sexuality, and the Body
An analysis of the history of gender, sexuality, and the body in European history. Topics covered may include religious views of gender and sexuality, sexuality and the state, the growth of sexology as an academic discipline, and the changing meanings and significance of sex and the body. In this course, students also gain an understanding of the centrality of course themes to the study of religion, the state, and the family in any historical time period.
1.000 Credit hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 866 - Medieval Europe: Its Ideas and Institutions
This course will focus on the history of Western Europe from the periods of the collapse of the Roman Empire in the West and the emergence of the Middles Ages to the decline of the Middle Ages in the fourteenth century. Topics include the settlement of Western Europe by the Germanic peoples; the merging of the Germanic, Classical and Christian cultures to form the civilization of the Middle Ages; the kingdom of the Franks, the empire of Charlemagne, and Frankish society and thought; feudalism; and the society and thought of the feudal kingdoms of France, England and Germany.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 868 - Intellectual History of Early Europe
An in-depth study of the ideas which represent the contributions of ancient Greece, ancient Rome, and the Middle Ages to the intellectual history of Western Europe. Special emphasis is placed upon the Ancient and Medieval concepts of man's nature and destiny.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 869 - History of the Crusades
An examination of the Crusades, and an experiment in religious warfare from the eleventh century to the Protestant Reformation. Topics include the development of theories of Holy War in Christianity and Islam, the motivations of those who fought on both sides of this lengthy conflict, and the long-term implications of the Crusades for relations between the adherants of Juadism, Christianity, and Islam. The course emphasizes the place of the Crusades with the wider context of European and Near Eastern History.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 870 - Intellectual History of Modern Europe
As a sequel to Intellectual History of Early Europe, the course evaluates outstanding ideologies which have appeared between the seventeenth and twentieth centuries. Within an historical context, developments in science, political theory, philosophy, and the arts are examined. The emergence of modern psychology, sociology, and economics also receives attention. The goal is to identify and appraise the points at which various intellectual pursuits have converged, and to determine how ideas are translated into actions. Among the topics considered are: the origins of modern rationalism, the scientific revolution, scientific and utopian socialism, conservatism, positivism, anarchism, existentialism, and a variety of counter-cultural movements.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 871 - Women in Modern Europe, 1500-2000
An historical examination of women's lives and ideas of gender in Europe. Through an analysis of social, economic, political, religious, intellectual, and cultural developments, this course explores how women have both experienced and shaped European history. Topics covered may include women's political action, work and the economy, religion, feminism, and family life. Students thus gain a greater understanding not only of women's lives, but also of the ways which one can study the history of women and gender. Prerequisites: 32.153 Western Civilization to the Renaissance, 32.154 Western Civilization since the Renaissance, or permission of instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 872 - Renaissance and Reformation Europe 1350-1650
A history of Europe from 1350 to 1650 with particular emphasis on the many faceted changeover from medieval to modern during this period: the decline of the papacy, the growth of the Italian Renaissance, Anglo-French rivalry, the rise of Spain, the Reformation, and the growth of modern science.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 875 - Superpower Diplomacy
An examination of European diplomacy since World War I. Special emphasis on Germany in the 1930's; World War II and the allied conferences; the Cold War and the roles played by Washington, Moscow, and Beijing; the emergence of a single Europe; and the diplomatic impact of the end of a superpower rivalry.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 876 - History of Modern France
The political, social, economic, and intellectual development of France since 1789. Particular emphasis is on the Revolution, Napoleon, the political experiments of the nineteenth century, the psychological collapse of the French in the first half of the twentieth century, and the rise of Charles DeGaulle through the socialists under Mitterand. Prerequisite: 32.154 Western Civilization since the Renaissance or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 878 - Modern Britain
An examination of the socio-economic, cultural, and political history of Britain from the seventeenth century to the present. Lectures and readings deal with such topics as Stuart and Georgian England, industrialization, Parliamentary reform, party politics, and the disintegration of the Empire.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

Course Attributes:
Graduate Level Course, Graduate Level Course

HIST 879 - Modern Ireland
An exploration of the history of Ireland from the eighteenth century to today. Students analyze the social, cultural, economic, intellectual, and political developments that have shaped Ireland’s history. Students also examine how the people of Ireland have defined both themselves and their nation and how Irish identities have changed.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

Course Attributes:
Graduate Level Course

HIST 880 - Blood, Iron, and Republic: Germany from 1866 to Present
Of primary interest is the German state from its unification to the present. Among the topics explored are the following: the general condition of the various German states during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the rise of Prussia, the impact of the Napoleonic conquest, the Revolution of 1848, Bismarck and the formation of the German Empire, the First World War, the failure of the Weimar Republic, Hitler's Regime, and the era of the two Germanies. Attention is also given to culture, society, and the economy.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 881 - Remaking Europe: History, Politics, and Culture since World War II
An examination of European history since the end of World War II. In this course students analyze how the politics, culture and society of both Western and Eastern Europe have been transformed since 1945. Topics covered may include the Cold War, decolonization, the emergence of the European Union, the fall of communism, and migration. Special focus is placed on European identities and how they have changed since 1945.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 885 - Portraits of Power
A biographical examination of the rise and development of major leaders in the respective countries or civilizations. This course considers the relationship between leaders and events to determine their influence in the development of history. Specific leaders will vary by semester. Students may take only one section of this course for credit.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 888 - The Path to Modernity: Russia from 1689 to the Present
A broad exploration of imperial Soviet and post-Soviet periods. Among the topics stressed are the Rurican, Byzantine and Muscovite formative influences of the Pre-Petrine era; the modernization of Russia under Peter I and his successors; the growth and development of intelligentsia during the nineteenth century; the emergence and dissolution of the USSR , and developments within the post-Communist epoch. Prerequisite: 32.154 Western Civilization since the Renaissance.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 890 - Seminar in History
A course in which a small group of students engages in advanced study and original research under the direction of a member of the faculty. In addition to their individual research projects, the students may be expected to produce and to discuss such assignments as book reviews and bibliographic essays. The course is open only to students who are junior, senior, or post-graduate history majors. No transfer course can fulfill this seminar requirement. Topics vary with the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 893 - Seminar in American History
All students majoring in American History must take at least one seminar in American history. The course is open only to students who have fulfilled the following prerequisites: Historical Research and Writing, Western Civilization since the Renaissance, United States History since Reconstruction, and two intermediate-division courses in the American concentration. No transfer course will fulfill this seminar requirement. The topics of the seminar will vary with the instructor. A schedule of the topics will be announced in advance for a two-year period. Seminars, in addition to the one required, may be taken for intermediate level credit.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Seminar

History Department

HIST 894 - Seminar in European/World History
All students majoring in European History must take at least one seminar in European/World History. This course is only open to students who have fulfilled the following prerequisites: Historical Research and Writing, Western Civilization since the Renaissance, United States History to Reconstruction, United States History since Reconstruction, and two intermediate- division courses in the European concentration. No transfer course will fulfill this seminar requirement. The topics of the seminar will vary with the instructor. A schedule of the topics will be announced in advance for a two-year period. Seminars, in addition to the one required, may be taken for intermediate level credit.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Seminar

History Department

HIST 898 - Modern China and Japan
An introduction to the philosophical, societal, political, economic, and cultural facets of modern China and Japan. The main emphasis is on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Special attention is given to the rise of Communism in China and the economic rebuilding of Japan since 1945. Prerequisite: 32.154 Western Civilization since the Renaissance, or 32.155 The Comparative History of World Civilizations, or an Asian area studies course.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 951 - The Main Currents in United States History
An examination of U.S. history from the age of exploration to the present. Based upon the instructional frameworks for elementary school teachers, this survey examines the main currents in American history so as to afford practicing teachers a solid foundation on which they may construct engaging reading assignments, absorbing classroom activities, and special projects for their students. The objective is to provide teachers with a comprehensive, solid grounding in United States history, its turning points and significance.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 959 - The Main Currents in Western Civilization
An examination of the history of western civilization from its origins to the present. Based upon the instructional frameworks for elementary school teachers, this survey examines the main currents in the history of western civilization so as to afford practicing teachers a solid foundation on which they may construct engaging reading assignments, absorbing classroom activities, and special projects for their students. The objective is to provide teachers with a comprehensive, solid grounding in the history of western civilization, its turning points and significance.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

History Department

HIST 990 - Directed Study in History
Course description varies with experience.
1.000 Credit hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study

History Department


Return to Previous New Search XML Extract
Transparent Image
Skip to top of page
Release: 8.5.4