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Summer 2012
Apr 20, 2014
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ENGL 802 - Comparative Mythology
A comparative study of primarily ancient myths through the Western and non-Western world, emphasizing such sources as Indian, Mayan, Finnish, Native American, Near Eastern, and Greek. Each belief system is first studied by itself before resemblances to other systems are sought. Finding elements that recur in a myth and that appear in other myths leads to considering the origin and nature of myth, as well as the significance of myth for a group of people.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 803 - Japanese Cinema
An intensive examination of a significant national cinema. This course focuses on the distinct aesthetic style and themes of such major directors as Ozu, Mizoguchi, and Kurosawa; the social, political, and cultural conditions that influence their films, and the ways in which these films reflect the values and concerns of Japanese society. Prerequisite: A previous film course or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 813 - Medieval and Renaissance Drama (Group A)
A study of English drama from its festive, religious, and classical roots to the popular entertainments of the pre-modern era. Readings include medieval mysteries and moralities, Renaissance pastoral plays, and Elizabethan-Jacobean tragedies and comedies, with attention to such authors as Marlowe, Jonson, Cary, Middleton, Webster, Beaumont and Fletcher (formerly English Drama from the Middle Ages to the Eighteenth Century. Prerequisite: One graduate English course; or two undergraduate English courses at the 300-level or higher; or permission of the instructor or chair of the English Department.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 814 - The Romantic Movement (Group B)
A critical and historical study of Romanticism in English literature. Concentration will be on the major poets: Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Prerequisite: Two undergraduate English courses at the 300-level or higher or one graduate literature course or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 816 - English Renaissance Literature (Group A)
The study of sixteenth and seventeenth-century authors who created a new national literature out of classical, continental, and native traditions. Through varying topics and study of such authors as Greene, Spenser, Sidney, Lanyer, Jonson, Wroth, Bacon, Donne, and Milton, students explore literary and cultural contexts for a rich array of genres, including lyric, romance, pastoral, essay and allegory (formerly Poetry and Prose of the English Renaissance). Prerequisite: One graduate English course; or two undergraduate English courses at the 300-level or higher; or permission of the instructor or chair of the English Department.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 817 - Rise and Establishment of the English Novel (Group B)
A study of the beginnings, development, and tradition of the novel in England through an examination of contributing prose forms of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and the major authors of eighteenth-century fiction such as Fielding, Smollett, and Austen. Prerequisite: Two undergraduate English courses at the 300-level or higher or one graduate literature course or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 818 - The Nineteenth Century British Novel (Group B)
A study of the nineteenth century British novel, including works from a variety of authors through the century, such as the Brontes, Dickens, George Eliot, Gissing, and Hardy (formerly Nineteenth and Twentieth Century English Fiction). Prerequisite: Two undergraduate English courses at the 300-level or higher or one graduate literature course or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 825 - Studies in Film
An exploration of a special topic in film. Topics, which change each time the course is offered, include the study of an individual director's body of work, classical or contemporary film theory, or a specific period in film history. Prerequisites: Completion of requirements for admission to the English graduate program and one of the following film courses: 21.205 Film History and Criticism, 21.206 Film and Literature, 21.207 The Language of Film, 21.208 Film Genres, or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 829 - The Victorian Period (Group B)
A study of British poetry and prose (exclusive of the novel) from the 1830's to the end of the nineteenth century with emphasis on forces and influences that have helped to shape the present. Historical and social backgrounds of the literature; major philosophical ideas and conflicts; aesthetic developments; and relationships with American and continental Europe are covered. Prerequisite: Two undergraduate English courses at the 300-level or higher or one graduate literature course or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 832 - Whitman, Dickinson and Frost (Group C)
Careful reading of selected writings which reflect the development of these two major New England poets. Prerequisite: One graduate English literature course or one undergraduate English literature course at the 200 level or higher.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

Course Attributes:
Graduate Level Course

ENGL 837 - Studies in Shakespeare (Group A)
An exploration of a special topic in Shakespearean drama, focusing on a theme, a genre, or a particular literary, social, or political context in selected plays. Shakespeare is studied as a poet, playwright, and thinker. Topics, which change every year, will include Shakespearean Families, Gender and Genre in Shakespeare, Shakespeare¿s Dramatic Imagery, and Shakespeare¿s Tragic Heroes. Prerequisite: One graduate English course; or two undergraduate English courses at the 300-level or higher; or permission of the instructor or chair of the English Department.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 843 - Russian Literature in Translation (Group E)
Novels, short stories, plays, and poetry by Russian writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Mayakovsky, Olesha, Babel, Pasternak, Solzhenitsyn, and Yevtushenko. The works will be studied for the purpose of tracing the continuing concerns of Russian writers before and after the Revolution. All readings will be in English translation. Prerequisite: One graduate English literature course or one undergraduate English literature course at the 200 level or higher.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 846 - Modern Drama (Group E)
Methods and types of modern continental, British and American drama. Critical reading and discussion of plays by such writers as Ibsen, Chekhov, Pirandello, Anouilh, Ionesco, Shaw, Miller, Williams, and Albee. Prerequisite: Two undergraduate English courses at the 300-level or higher or one graduate literature course or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 848 - Studies in the Bible as Literature (Group D)
An in-depth study of the literary art of the Bible in the context of the literature of the ancient Middle East. Focusing on specific topics, the course investigates the special literary characteristics of sacred texts, and may emphasize particular techniques (such as allusion, repetition, or parallelism) or genres (such as poetry, epic, prophecy fable, or history) within the Bible canon. Prerequisite: One graduate English literature course or one undergraduate English literature course at the 200 level or higher.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 850 - Modern British and American Poetry (Group B or Group C but not both)
A study of various modern poets, including Yeats, Eliot, Frost, Robinson, Houseman, Hardy, and Hopkins. Attention is be given to various theories about the nature and function of modern poetry, particularly where these theories differentiate modern poetry from the poetry of the past. Prerequisite: One graduate English literature course or one undergraduate English literature course at the 200 level or higher.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 852 - The Twentieth-Century Novel (Group E)
Major writers, ideas and forms of the twentieth-century novel in Europe and America, with emphasis on the first half of the century. Close reading and discussion of representative works by such writers as Joyce, Hesse, Faulkner, Camus, and Bellow. Prerequisite: One graduate English literature course or one undergraduate English literature course at the 200 level or higher.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 858 - Writing Fiction
A workshop in reading and writing short fiction with an emphasis on writing from personal experience, use of traditional forms, and developing narrative voice, characters, plot, and setting.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 860 - Critical Writing
An advanced writing course designed to foster theoretically informed textual analysis. The course includes extensive study of literary theory, research, and writing about a variety of works. Prerequisite: One graduate English literature course or one undergraduate English literature course at the 200 level or higher.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 861 - Creative Writing
A study of the methods and techniques of creative writing with emphasis on the variety of forms used in contemporary literature. Students will be encouraged to experiment both in prose and poetry in order to develop new strategies to express their experiences and feelings. Manuscripts will be read in class.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 862 - American Romanticism (Group C)
A critical study of essays, novels, short stories, and poetry by some of the major American writers of the first half of the nineteenth century. Through a consideration of writers such as Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Poe, students explore the aesthetic developments and philosophical ideas expressed through the genre of Romanticism and its related movement, Transcendentalism. The cultural and historical background of the genre is also discussed. Prerequisite: One graduate English course; or two undergraduate English courses at the 300-level or higher; or permission of the instructor or chair of the English Department.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 863 - Prose Writing
The writing of non-fiction prose, including narration, description, and exposition, to help students improve their general ability to communicate experiences, observations, and thoughts.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 864 - Postcolonial Literature
A study of postcolonial literature by authors with cultural roots in South Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, and other former colonies that achieved independence in the second half of the twentieth century. Readings may include Commonwealth literature from Australia, New Zealand, and Canada; translated texts; and postcolonial criticism. Prerequisites: Two (2) undergraduate literature courses at the 300-level or higher and one (1) graduate literature course; or permission of instructor.
1.000 Credit hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 865 - Professional Writing
A career-oriented course introducing students to a wide variety of writing formats used in business, government, and the professions. Resumes, employment documents, letters and memos, short proposals, public relations, advertising documents, and basic aspects of technical description are among the writing assignments. Critiquing, rewriting, editing, and word processing are integral parts of this course. Note: Credit will not be given for this course if it is taken after Business Communication and/or Technical Writing.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 870 - Current Trends in Children's Literature
A theoretically informed study of current books for children and young adults, with particular emphasis on literary developments, publishing and marketing trends, and recent academic debates. Students consider the social, technological, and professional contexts in which children¿s books are created, evaluated and marketed. Students enrolled in this course for graduate credit are expected to produce an extensive essay of literary analysis as well as additional assignments as determined by the instructor. Prerequisites: Two (2) undergraduate courses at the 300-level or higher or one graduate literature course or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 871 - Business Writing
An advanced course to develop students' abilities in business communication, both written and oral. Typical projects involve work on newsletters, brochures, proposals, documented reports, and speeches, as well as major oral and written presentations including visual aids. Students are exposed to the problems of writing within a business organization and to the strategic value of word choice, tone and tact in corporate communications. The course will include hands-on experience in word processing and use of graphics. Prerequisite: 21.865 Professional Writing orpermission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 872 - Technical Writing
An advanced writing course culminating in preparation of major reports based on technical subjects and meeting publication standards in the field. Students are exposed to technology and to methods of objective reporting and writing definitions, descriptions, instructions, and summaries. The course includes editing and writing for technical and non-technical audiences and hands-on experience in word processing and graphics. Prior coursework in technical subjects is useful. Prerequisite: 21.865 Professional Writing or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 873 - Chaucer (Group A)
The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and other shorter poems in relation to Chaucer¿s world and time, his development as an artist, and the lasting value of his works. The works will be read in Middle English; an introduction to Chaucer¿s language will be given. Prerequisite: One graduate English course; or two undergraduate English courses at the 300-level or higher; or permission of the instructor or chair of the English Department.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 874 - American Realism and Naturalism (Group C)
A critical study of works from the major American writers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, including such writers as Crane, Dreiser, James, Jewett, Twain, and Wharton. Emphasis is on the development of realism and naturalism, and on the historical, political, and cultural contexts of these literary movements. Prerequisite: One graduate English course; or two undergraduate English courses at the 300-level or higher; or permission of the instructor or chair of the English Department.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 875 - History of Children's Literature
A survey of children¿s literature from the eighteenth century to the present. Topics may include early chapbooks, picture books, and the development of the novel for children. Students examine changing representations of the child and the role literature has played in defining childhood. Students will produce an extensive essay of literary analysis as well as additional assigments as determined by the instructor. Prerequisites: One graduate literature course or two undergraduate literature courses at the 300-level of higher; or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 876 - Modern American Fiction
An advanced study of major modern American writers such as Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Cather, West, Faulkner, Hurston, and Wright in the context of the historical and cultural developments of the first half of the twentieth century. Prerequisites: Two undergraduate English literature courses at the 300-level or higher, one graduate English literature course, or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated
Schedule Types: Lecture

English Department

Course Attributes:
Graduate Level Course

ENGL 879 - Studies in World Literature
An examination of a special topic in world literature. Particular works covered may range from classical to contemporary texts, in English or in translation. Topics change each time the course is offered and may include the classical literature of Greece and Rome, the nineteenth-century European novel, and contemporary African literature. Note: Depending on the topic, the course may fulfill the requirement for Group D or Group E.
1.000 Credit hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

Course Attributes:
Graduate Level Course

ENGL 880 - Writing for Publication
An advanced writing course in which students learn to produce professional quality essays. Each time the course is offered, it will focus on three general areas, such as: Writing about Public Affairs; Writing about Science and Technology; Writing about the Arts; Writing about Gender; and Writing about Sports. In each area students will read published writing, study the markets, and write extended essays. Classes include workshops, individual conferences, and simulation of what occurs at each stage of the writing process leading to publication.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 881 - Writing for Children
An advanced writing workshop in the methods and techniques of writing for children. Students compose poetry, fiction-and non-fiction prose for readers aged three to eighteen. Activities include analysis of children¿s literature and group critiques of students¿ work. As an advanced course, this workshop requires a strong background in creative writing and students are expected to produce an extensive portfolio of sophisticated creative work. Note: Inexperienced writers are advised to first take a creative writing course at the 200/undergraduate level. Prerequisites: Two (2) undergraduate courses at the 300-level or higher or one graduate literature course or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 883 - Contemporary American Fiction
A study of American fiction since 1945, including writers such as Bellow, DeLillo, Doctorow, Ellison, Morrison, Nabokov, Pynchon, Roth, Tyler, Updike, and Walker. Emphasis is on postmodern narrative experiments and on representations of the self and American experience in the contemporary period. Note: Students will not receive credit for both ENGL 883 Contemporary American Fiction and ENGL 379 Contemporary European and American Literature. Prerequisite: A course in Literary Studies or permission of instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

Course Attributes:
Graduate Level Course

ENGL 885 - Seminar in Prose Writing
An advanced writing workshop for students who have already had some experience in writing nonfiction, and who now wish to complete extended projects or work on new material. The course explores various types of creative nonfiction: biography and memoir, and writing about travel, food, nature, and society. Classes are devoted to discussion of student work and to some discussion of notable nonfiction. Prerequisite: ENGL 284/ENGL 863 Prose Writing or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Seminar

English Department

ENGL 888 - Literature for the Young Child
The study of literature for the child from toddler through grade 3, resulting in the completion of an extensive independent research essay: folktales, nursery rhymes and poetry, picture and picture storybooks, easy-to-read books, informational books, and novels for beginning readers. The various genres are examined in relation to aesthetic criteria, social implications, and appropriate audiences. An introduction to selective bibliographic tools and review media is included. Prerequisite: One graduate English literature course or one undergraduate English literature course at the 200 level or higher.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 889 - Practicum in English
A supervised practical experience related to the student's background and interests, with a written report required as part of the work of the course. Arrangements must be made during the semester before the beginning of the practicum and approved by the chair of the English Department.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Practicum

English Department

ENGL 890 - The English Language
A study of the ancestry of English, of the processes and results of change in sound, form, and meaning; and an analysis of the present structure of English and of the methods of describing the structure. In addition, the classification of languages, social and regional dialects, and theories of language origin and acquisition are examined in order to give the student a general understanding of modern developments in linguistics. Prerequisite: One graduate English literature course or one undergraduate English literature course at the 200 level or higher.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 895 - Seminar in Creative Writing
Students will be encouraged to follow their own writing interests, particularly in long projects. Reading and discussion of manuscripts. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Seminar

English Department

ENGL 896 - Seminar in Literature
An advanced seminar whose topic, a period, theme or major author, changes from term to term. Students are responsible for original criticism and research in the form of several short papers, oral presentations, and an extended research paper. Prerequisite: One graduate English literature course or two undergraduate English literature course at the 300-level or higher; or permission of the instructor or English Department Chair.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated, Post-Baccalaureate
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Seminar

English Department

ENGL 919 - Twentieth-Century Literature of the American South (Group C)
A study of the diverse writing of the American South in relation to the historical, socioeconomic, and cultural context of the region from which it emerged. Themes may include race relations and the influence of the Civil War on southern views of regional and national identity. Critical reading of works by authors such as James Weldon Johnson, William Faulkner, Erskine Caldwell, Zora Neale Hurston, Alan Tate, Robert Penn Warren, Ralph Ellison, Flannery O'Connor, and Walker Percy. Prerequisite: One graduate English literature course or one undergraduate English literature course at the 200 level or higher.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 930 - Workshop in Children's Literature
An advanced workshop that explores the relationship between children¿s literature and the curriculum of grades Pre-K through 12. Students study various genres in children¿s and young adult literature, submitting lesson plans and related activities to the class for critique. Special attention is paid to children¿s book authors and illustrators recommended by the Massachusetts English Language Arts Curriculum Framework. Note: This course is designed for teachers interested in enhancing their classes. Those interested in the literary analysis of Children¿s Literature are advised to enroll in ENGL 875 History of Children's Literature, ENGL 870 Current Trends in Children's Literature, ENGL 942 Children's Literature: Critical Approaches, and ENGL 913 Young Adult Literature: Critical Approaches. Students who have taken ENGL 887 Workshop in Children¿s Literature may not receive credit for this course.
1.000 Credit hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 942 - Children's Literature: Critical Approaches
A critical approach to traditional and contemporary literature for children from Pre-K through grade 6 including poetry, folklore, fantasy, realistic and problem stories, biography and selected informational books. Students build on previous coursework in children¿s literature to apply evaluative criteria to the titles under consideration. In this advanced literature course, students read primary sources, critical essays, developing literary theories, and current topics in children¿s literature and complete an extensive, analytical, researched essay. This is an intensive course in literary analysis. Students beginning graduate study in Children¿s Literature are advised to enroll in ENGL 870 Current Trends in Children¿s Literature and/or ENGL 875 History of Children¿s Literature; students interested in studying Children¿s Literature for curriculum enhancement are advised to enroll in ENGL 930 Workshop in Children¿s Literature. Note: Students who have taken ENGL 866 Literature for Children may not receive credit for this course. Prerequisites: Two (2) undergraduate courses at the 300-level or higher or one graduate literature course or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

Course Attributes:
Graduate Level Course

ENGL 946 - Young Adult Literature: Critical Approaches
An advanced course that studies literature for children from grades 6 through 12. Students build on previous coursework in children¿s literature through the examination of classic and contemporary primary texts, literary criticism and recent theoretical developments. Textual analysis and evaluative criteria are applied in an extensive research essay. This is an intensive course in literary analysis. Students beginning graduate study in Children¿s Literature are advised to enroll in ENGL 870 Current Trends in Children¿s Literature and/or ENGL 875 History of Children¿s Literature; students interested in studying Children¿s Literature for curriculum enhancement are advised to enroll in ENGL 930 Workshop in Children¿s Literature. Note: Students who have taken ENGL 869 Literature for Young Adults may not receive credit for this course. Prerequisites: Two (2) undergraduate courses at the 300-level or higher or one graduate literature course or permission of the instructor.
1.000 Credit hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study, Lecture

English Department

ENGL 990 - Directed Study in English
A directed study supervised by a graduate faculty member of the English Department. The Directed Study will not substitute for Seminar in Literature. Directed Studies in different topics may be taken with the approval of the student's advisor. Prerequisite: Permission of the course instructor, program advisor, and Chair of the English Department.
1.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Graduate, Non-Matriculated
Schedule Types: Independent/Directed Study

English Department


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